Parents must keep copies of this document for themselves to which they can refer in the event of a dispute, misunderstanding or desire to establish a written amendment to the agreement. A custody agreement is used by parents to define the details of how they will educate their child or children together, when they are no longer romantically involved. The agreement deals with issues such as physical and legal custody, visiting plans, health insurance, university and, if desired, family allowances. Parents can use this document to develop a plan that is satisfactory to both parties on how they will raise their children together without having to cede control of decision-making to a judge. If both parents can be civilian and work in the best interests of their children, they can save time, money and energy by establishing a custody agreement themselves. When it comes to matters relating to children, such as custody, access and assistance, a court must approve any agreement that uses a standard for the “best interests of the child”. As a general rule, if both parents reach an agreement on these issues, a court will be prepared to include the agreement in official legal documents. However, a court may require an adaptation of the agreement when it finds that the agreement is not in the best interests of the children concerned. Almost all provincial chambers of attorneys have referral services that can help you connect with lawyers who offer free or discounted consultations the first time. Your state may also have family justice services that can recommend mediation that can help reach an out-of-court agreement with the other parent.

If parents wish to draw up a document that only covers the maintenance of the children, they should use a child assistance agreement. This agreement contains all the essential details of how parents will educate their children together. First, the document addresses the issue of child custody as follows: the letter of support agreement should be simple and logical. It should contain the amount to be paid and the due date of payment. . . .